Friday, Oct. 14

04-14 Peripheral Plagues: Localizing Illness in Medieval and Early Modern Texts

Friday, October 14, 8:30 am–10:00 am
Director 5

Sponsored by the Medieval and Early Modern Folklore Section


Chair: Charlotte Artese (Agnes Scott College)

8:30 am
Holy Anorexia Reconsidered: Interpreting Saints Legends Through the Lens of Disordered Eating
Theresa A. Vaughan (University of Central Oklahoma)

8:45 am
Redefining “Madness” as Mental Illness in Medieval Islamic Societies
Heather M. Hoyt (Arizona State University)

9:15 am
The Perfect Body Corrupted: The Eucharist and Spiritual Corruption in Medieval Visionary Works
Judith K. Lanzendorfer (University of Findlay)

9:30 am
Exile and Holy Healing in Macbeth and “Crescentia” (ATU 712)
Charlotte Artese (Agnes Scott College)

This panel focuses on illness in physically, psychologically, and spiritually peripheral places. “Between Horror and Hope: Obstetrics and Embryology in Late-Medieval Depictions of the Last Judgment” examines Italian depictions of Hell. “Holy Anorexia Reconsidered: Interpreting Saints Legends Through the Lens of Disordered Eating” suggests interpretations through the lenses of folk religion and medieval medicine. “Redefining ‘Madness’ as Mental Illness in Medieval Islamic Societies“ addresses how Hellenistic and Islamic influences (re)shaped medical and social perspectives. “The Perfect Body Corrupted: The Eucharist and Spiritual Corruption in Medieval Visionary Works” examines how the medieval concept of the “polluted body” can make communion a peripheral place. Finally, “Exile and Holy Healing in Macbeth and ‘Crescentia’ (ATU 712)” considers faith-healing in peripheral places.